Ice, Ice, Baby

Ice, Ice, Baby

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR BEFORE PARTICIPATING IN CRYOTHERAPY

Walking into a spaceship-like contraption while it fills with nitrogen gas and plummets to subzero temperatures doesn’t sound appealing. But whole-body cryotherapy has been popular among the wellness community. My first experience was on Wednesday and I had two more sessions on the following days.

Before the session, the technician explained the process to me, took my blood pressure, and had me sign a consent form. Since I have a spinal fusion, I asked a few of my doctors if the metal rods would be a problem in the cold temperatures and I was assured that it would be okay. The tech provided me with wool socks and booties and wool mittens. I also used the wool elbow sleeves.

The chamber was pre-chilled as I stepped in but it filled with the nitrogen gas as the tech started the machine. The tech talked to me throughout the whole three minute experience and gave me time updates every 30 seconds. The recommended amount of time is at least 1 minute but 3 minutes maximum.

An important component of the 8-week program I am doing at PALM Health is called the Trilogy, which encompasses cryotherapy followed by 30 minutes in the infrared sauna and a 25-minute salt room session. The purpose of pairing these three services is to promote detoxification for reducing inflammation and rebalancing neurotransmitters.

Days 2 and 3 of cryotherapy were much better since I knew what to expect. I slept well on the following nights and have noticed less muscle soreness from my weight-training workouts.